Mary Meets Mohammad

I’ve just seen a remarkable movie.

It’s not remarkable in the way that movies are usually remarkable – mind-blowing graphics; intricate plot-lines; mega-star performances; astonishing budgets – none of that.

The thing that sets this movie apart is the enormity of its humanity.

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iPad subscription App crowd-funding

Today marks the public launch of the New Internationalist crowd-funding campaign – StartSomeGood.com/indy-media-app – for the design and distribution of our iPad and iPhone subscriptions App and we’d be super-appreciative of your help.

There are so many ways you can help:

Would you grab the opportunity to nurture a young activist?

The future is in good hands.  The Australian Youth Climate Coalition, GetUp, The Oaktree Foundation and many other organizations are supported by crowds of enthusiastic young activists.

The best activism is supported by meticulous research and motivational stories, and that’s exactly the specialty of the New Internationalist magazine.

Can you please help us with a pledge so that we can nurture more young activists?
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How many awards does it take to draw in a subscriber?

How many awards does it take to draw in a subscriber?

Just one more, it seems.

If the New Internationalist magazine were a wine bottle, there’d be so many gold medals that there’d barely be room for the label. And if we were a blockbuster movie, the nominations and award wins would be so numerous, you could melt down the poster to retrieve the gold.

Now I know modesty is golden too, but just occasionally I hope we might be forgiven for sharing the accolades we’ve had from our peers, just so you know you’re not the only one who thinks we’re worth supporting. Here are a few of the awards that I know about:
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Four decades in the life of the world

It was 1978. I was a young whipper-snapper working with Community Aid Abroad (now renamed OXFAM Australia). I’d heard a stirring speech by Peter Adamson on ABC radio, and now I was excited at the prospect of meeting the man in person. I was not disappointed. His towering intellect and his ability to weave a spell-binding story combined to make his visit one of the most memorable of my life.

This remarkable man was the founding editor of the New Internationalist magazine, which had been launched five years earlier, and he was in Australia to inspire people with a vision of progress in human development, and to promote the magazine.

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The slow death of quality resources for schools

When, in 1992, I started to work in publishing for schools in the UK, the future looked bright. The Government had recently introduced a National Curriculum. So, for the first time, publishers could produce textbooks knowing that all schools in the UK would be covering the same subject matter. In the UK, there were around 4,000 secondary schools teaching around 4 million students and since it was the policy of most schools to buy ‘class sets’, there was a large market to target. Provided that publishers found the right format and approach, they could expect sales in their thousands. At the same time, technology was changing. Design was moving from the drawing board to the computer. Printing presses were becoming digitised, lowering costs. For the first time, printing textbooks in colour was becoming affordable even for small publishers.

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