No-No Guide to World Music

By Louise Gray

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  • Engaging and thought provoking
  • Explores genres that have emerged from marginalised communities
  • 110 x 180 mm, paperback
  • 168 pages

The magazine is a secular publication. Readers, both Christian and non-Christian, may not always agree with all its conclusions. But it is an excellent catalyst for better informed thought and action. It pulls no punches yet at the same time is written with sensitivity and compassion … could be of immense help in our becoming more globally aware and responsible citizens.

Gil Cann, editor, Working Together (published by the Australian Evangelical Alliance)

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World Council of Churches

What motivated the founders of the New Internationalist magazine was a high idealism; a real sense that we could change things; that if people knew the facts about what was going on, then they could actually have the wherewithal to campaign and try to make the world a better place.

Troth Wells - one of the founders of the New Internationalist cooperative

New Internationalist is a magazine well worth reading as it respects the intelligence of its readers. It is independent, lively and properly provocative, helping to keep its readers abreast of important developments in parts of our globe that risk marginalisation. Read it!.

Desmond M Tutu - Archbishop of Cape Town

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This new guide is an exploration of what "world music" actually means and an introduction to global sounds. 'World Music' is an awkward phrase. Used to describe the hugely multifaceted nature of a range of, typically, non-English-language popular musics from the world over, it's a tag that throws up as many problems as it does solutions.

Louise Gray's No-Nonsense Guide to World Music attempts to go behind the phrase to explore the reasons for the contemporary interest in world music, who listens to it and why. Through chapters that focus on specific areas of music, such as rembetika, fado, trance music and new folk, it explores the genres that have emerged from marginalized communities, music in conflict zones and music as escapism.

In this unique guide which combines the seduction of sound with politics and social issues, the author makes the case for music as a powerful tool able to bring individuals together.

Louise Gray is a writer and editor whose work on music and performing arts has appeared in the New Internationalist, The Wire, The Independent on Sunday, The Guardian and Art Review. She co-edited Sound and the City (British Council, 2007), a book exploring the changing soundworld of China.

Diagrams, charts and graphs used throughout to illustrate key information.

ISBN / Barcode: 9781906523121

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